B Page -- Oct. 22, 2010


Twanmoh 

That’s when one finds out Twanmoh was a 12-season athlete in high school, competing in soccer, tennis and swimming. He collected 10 varsity letters total and was a contributor in the 4x100 relay and butterfly races as the Fallston High School swim team ran off three-straight Maryland state titles. As a senior, Twanmoh also helped lead the Cougars to their first-ever state finals in men’s soccer.

When he says he doesn’t have too much free time, he’s not exaggerating. Twanmoh also serves as the community service chair for CASA (Case Association of Student-Athletes) and also takes care of business in the classroom, where he is currently working toward a dual major in biology and chemistry with a minor in sports medicine.

On the soccer field, Twanmoh has played in 14 games and started 12 for the Spartans this season. With one goal to his credit, he is third on the team with 17 shots. Twanmoh holds down one of the center midfielder positions for Case, a role which requires significant versatility as he plays dual roles in fueling the Spartan attack and defusing opponent’s offenses.   

Ross is an incredibly hardworking and coachable player,” said men’s soccer head coach Dan Palmer. “He is a great person, and we are very fortunate to have him on our team.

Q&A WITH ROSS TWANMOH

WAS IT ORIGINALLY IN YOUR THOUGHTS TO PLAY COLLEGIATE-LEVEL SOCCER?

“I wasn’t sure if I was actually going to play soccer in college, I was kind of rejected across the board on my college applications. But I got some academic scholarship money here and Coach Palmer seemed like a great guy, so that made my decision a lot easier.”

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY YOUR ROLE IS TO THE TEAM AND WHAT DO YOU BRING TO THE GROUP?

“I bring my passion. I play with a lot of heart. I leave everything I’ve got on the field. Another thing I bring to the team is that I’m a little humorous every now and then. Sometimes we get a little too serious, and when we’re not playing soccer it’s nice to get out and hang with each other and I think I don’t take things as seriously compared to some of the other guys. We have little jokes between each other and stuff, but I guess that’s for us to know.”

“I was looking for more of an urban campus. And getting some academic scholarship money was definitely helpful, especially in this day and age when college is extremely expensive. I guess it was good academics, good athletics and the scholarship money that were the things that brought me here.”

WHAT’S THE PLAN AFTER CASE?

“I’m not exactly sure what the plan is after school. I guess I haven’t figured it out yet, but I know I’m passionate about working with animals on an observational level. Like animal behavior and seeing how different animals interact with their environment, that kind of thing. I also have a minor in sports medicine, so that’s on the backburner if I need it.”

DESCRIBE CASA AND TELL US ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THE ORGANIZATION…

“It’s something I found out about last year and thought would be interesting. It’s a lot like Varsity Club, which is what we had at my high school, except a lot more student-run. I volunteered to be the community service chair, and that’s been working out pretty well. So far we’ve organized the Case for Community Day, which was where we brought in a lot of local schools and basically just had a field day with the kids. We tried to get them involved [in sports] and got them moving around.

We’re also working on a project with University Hospitals. We had a meeting already and it’s in the works that we’re going to start volunteering at Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital. We’re basically going to work with the kids that can’t leave the hospital – kids with organ transplants, kids with cancer – hopefully just give them something to brighten their day.”

BEING A THREE-SPORT ATHLETE IN HIGH SCHOOL, DO YOU HAVE MORE OR LESS FREE TIME NOW THAN YOU USED TO?

“I definitely think I had more free time in high school, but I don’t think I realized it. It’s a little different living at home as opposed to living with your friends, but the work was definitely a lot easier. I definitely took that for granted in high school. But I wouldn’t go back to it, though. College is great and living with my friends is awesome.”

IS IT TOUGH FOR YOU TO BALANCE BEING AN ATHLETE WITH ACADEMICS, AND THEN ALL THE OTHER EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES YOU ARE UNDERTAKING?

“Actually, being a student-athlete, yeah it’s very stressful. But in a way it actually structures your time a lot better because you don’t have as much free time, so with the time you do have you know you have to get your work done. Coach [Palmer] actually says most of the team does better in-season versus in the spring because we have a lot less free time. But yeah, there’s still definitely a lot of late nights for me.”   

Note: “Spartan Spotlight” is a bi-weekly to monthly series that highlights a Case Western Reserve University student-athlete and his/her exploits on and off the playing field. The series is meant to provide an inside look at the unique backgrounds of Spartan student-athletes and show what it takes to succeed athletically and academically at one of the nation’s premier research institutions.


                                              
Mount Union 
Broadcaster Joe 
Tait hospitalized

October 21, 2010
 

Joe Tait, the hall of fame broadcaster for the Mount Union, will miss the remainder of the Purple Raiders 2010 football season as he is slated to have heart surgery.

Tait has been resting and receiving treatment for pneumonia since returning home from Houston, where he was hospitalized last week. As Joe continues to recover from pneumonia, he recently underwent a series of tests on his heart at The Cleveland Clinic. It has been determined that Joe is experiencing aortic stenosis and will soon undergo procedures on his heart to replace a valve and address other heart related concerns. These procedures will be conducted upon Joe's further recovery from pneumonia.

At this time, no exact timetable has been established for Joe's return to game broadcasts, but he is expected to be out at least through the rest of 2010.

Joe is in very good spirits and wanted to again thank the fans for their outpouring of support and concern for him during this time and he looks forward to getting back behind the mic as soon as he is able.

Tait, 73, has been the Cavaliers' radio announcer for every season since the team began play in 1970, except for the 1981-82 and 82-83 seasons, and has also stated that this will be his last season with the Cavs.

He began doing Mount Union football and basketball games with Harry Paidas on television in 1986, the same yearLarry Kehres was named head football coach, and has stated before that he wishes to continue doing Purple Raiders games in 2011 and beyond.

"All of our thoughts and prayers are with Joe and his family," commented Kehres.  "Gameday at Mount Union Stadium is not the same without Joe around and all of us hope he can return soon."

Mount Union sports information director Lenny Reich will join Paidas for this week's football game against Capital, which kicks off at 1:30 pm and will be replayed on cable channel SportsTime Ohio (7pm Saturday, 3pm Sunday and noon on Monday) and locally in Stark County on WIVM Ch. 52 (8pm Saturday, 1pm Sunday).

Mount Union alum, University of Akron and Cleveland Browns stadium announcerJeff Shreve '87 will join Paidas for the regular season finale against Muskingum on Nov. 13.

Parts of this release came from cavs.com and cleveland.com


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